Results

The results of the 2021 Census are available free to any interested party in the form of open anonymous data. It is therefore not possible to assign specific statistical data to individual persons, houses, flats or households. Nevertheless, the 2021 Census represents a valuable source of data on life in the Czech Republic. Compare the 2021 Census with the previous decades.
Results
2021 Census Results
The results of the 2021 Census will be published in their entirety at the turn of 2021 and 2022.
2011 Census of Population, Houses and Dwellings

In 2011, a quarter of the population was counted electronically. The Czech Statistical Office received a total of 4.33 million forms in electronic form. That included 2.8 million census forms from persons, 1.05 million household forms and 0.48 million housing forms. At the time of the census, 62 children were exactly one day old. The oldest electronically counted person was 106 years old.

More on the 2011 Census website.

2001 Census of Population, Houses and Dwellings

The 2001 Census of Population, Housing and Dwellings was conducted in accordance with the methodological recommendations of the UN and Eurostat as a self-census. This means that each person filled in the census form either for themselves, their children or other persons in the household.

More on the CZSO website.

1991 Czechoslovak Census

Another Czechoslovak census took place on 3 March 1991. How the census was conducted did not differ from previous censuses, but the rapidly changing socio-political situation after November 1989 was reflected in some content and methodological changes.

More on the CZSO website.

1980 Czechoslovak Census

The fourth post-war census took place on 1 November 1980. It was essentially the same as the 1970 Census. Improvements in female fertility data, classification of basic housing units according to type and size, and the directional processing of commuting data was considered new. More important was the uniform processing of information about the shortage of housing up to the level of individual cities.

More on the CZSO website.

1970 Czechoslovak Census

The 1970 Census took place on 1 December 1970. The 1970 census was also accompanied by a sample survey of 2% of all households – a micro census, which aimed to determine the differentiation in income levels of different groups of households and the impact of some other aspects of their standard of living.

More on the CZSO website.

1961 Czechoslovak Census

The 1961 Census is the first integrated census providing linked data on population, households, dwellings and houses. This connection brought a completely new quality of data and significantly expanded the options for their use.

More on the CZSO website.

1950 Czechoslovak Census

The first general Census after World War II took place on 1 March 1950. It closely followed the 1930 Census. As usual, it took place throughout the country at the time, but unlike every previous and some subsequent censuses, it differed in many aspects.

More on the CZSO website.

1946 and 1947 Population Census

Holding the census was brought about mainly by major post-war changes. It was not possible to wait until the results of the envisaged Census in 1950. The census took place in Slovakia on 4 October 1946 and in Czech territory on 22 May 1947. It should be noted that it was not a census in the true sense of the word.

More on the CZSO website.

1930 Czechoslovak Census

The second Czechoslovak census took place on 1 December 1930 in accordance with Act No. 47/1927 Coll. It was based on the experience of the 1921 census, but the census programme was expanded in several ways.

More on the CZSO website.

1921 First Czechoslovak Census

In 1919, the State Statistical Office was established as a new body responsible for nationwide statistical surveys. One of the most important was the census. The newly formed Czechoslovak Republic needed to know the most detailed demographic data of the newly created state.

More on the CZSO website.

Census in Austria-Hungary

The Austro-Hungarian Census aimed to find out the current number of the present population, and later, the directions of migration. Furthermore, to capture the rapid and significant structural changes that the then society was experiencing, and finally to determine the ethnic composition of individual regions and places.

More on the CZSO website.

Modern census predecessors

The oldest surviving inventory in the Czech lands is considered the inventory of the property of the Litoměřice church from 1058, which is part of the charter of Prince Spytihněv II. Other sources reveal that the inventories carried out in our territory since the Middle Ages pursued mainly military and tax purposes.

More on the CZSO website.